BREAKING NEWS: President Trump arrives in Milton Keynes

😂 *splutter* I’m American and I live in MK. This is sublime!!

LouBou

Read on for the latest as it unfolds…

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24 Things Women Over 30 Should Wear

Ohhhhhh yeah. Stilettos 👠 in my wheelchair? Check!!

Warning:Curves Ahead

This morning, as I was perusing my Facebook timeline, I happened upon an article that a lovely friend shared. It was entitled “24 Things Women Should Stop Wearing After Age 30”, and it triggered Maximum Eye-Rolling from everyone who took the time out to read it.

Written by Kallie Provencher for RantChic.com, this “article” (I use the term loosely) highlighted things such as “leopard print”, “graphic tees”, and “short dresses” (because “By this age, women should know it’s always better to leave something to the imagination”). Kallie, it seems, has a number of opinions on what women over 30 should and shouldn’t be doing, having also penned “30 Things Women Over 30 Shouldn’t Own” and “20 Pictures Women Over 30 Need To Stop Posting Online”. (What is this magical post-30 land where women are suddenly not allowed to do or own so many things?!)

Motivated by Kallie’s “article”, I decided to…

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Forgotten wisdom: what happens when we die?

The figure of Death shown in the photo is from Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series of novels. He is caring, curious about humanity and loves life. He also speaks in CAPITAL LETTERS.

The editors may not have realised it, but the photo actually piqued my interest in the article which was articulate and very well-written. It made me smile and I found it comforting, like an old friend. 🌸

“And what would humans be without love?” RARE, said Death. — from the novel ‘Sourcery’

British Geriatrics Society

8376547873_822be9a7e4_oDr Kathryn Mannix is a Palliative Care consultant based at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Newcastle, who began the UK’s first dedicated palliative care CBT clinic.

‘We’re all going to die!’

No, not a scary action movie, but life. We have been dying for millennia and notwithstanding medical advances, the death rate remains 100%. And yet, despite so many opportunities to study the phenomena around dying, most doctors are unable to describe the process that takes people out of the world.

What a contrast with the processes of pregnancy and birth, to which magazines, shops and websites are dedicated; lessons are delivered in schools; couples are invited for ‘birth practice’ sessions as the due date approaches… Perhaps not all of these analogies are directly transferable to the process of dying, especially as 50% of candidates will expire suddenly, but dying is a recognisable process and modern medicine has largely forgotten it…

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